Laser Hair Removal
& Laser Skin Services Near St. Stephen, SC

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Some of our most popular services include:

 Fat Reduction St. Stephen, SC

Laser Skin Services

 CoolSculpting Clinic St. Stephen, SC

Laser Hair Removal

 CoolSculpting Specialist St. Stephen, SC

Botox

 Safe Fat Loss St. Stephen, SC

Facials

 Fat Freezing St. Stephen, SC

Dermal Fillers

 Skin Tightening St. Stephen, SC

Body Sculpting

 Body Toning St. Stephen, SC

Services for Acne and Acne Scarring

 Cellulite Treatment St. Stephen, SC

Men's Services

 Facial Remodeling St. Stephen, SC

Tattoo Removal

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Physical-therapy-phone-number843-277-2240

Some of the most requested laser skin services at Southern Cosmetic Laser include:

Laser Hair Removal in St. Stephen, SC

Unwanted hair. You know it's there, and just about every day, you've got to shave, pluck, and tweeze your way to removing it. But what if we told you there was a permanent solution to reduce your unwanted hair problem?

At Southern Cosmetic Laser, our laser hair removal services target hair follicles giving your skin the smooth, silky feel you've may desire. Laser hair removal services save you time in shaving - a proposition that seemed impossible a few years ago.

Using the most up-to-date lasers for our services, we offer a permanent hair-reduction solution for all skin types, making it a quick, effective treatment for any ethnicity. Our state-of-the-art laser technologies emit a laser beam that penetrates your hair follicles, destroying the root while preserving your skin.

 Tattoo Removal St. Stephen, SC

Our clients are ditching their razors and choosing our lasers to remove hair from their bikini lines, underarms,
upper lips, legs, arms, face, chest and back.

A few benefits of laser hair removal include:

  • Eliminate Stubborn, Unwanted Hair
  • Prevent Ingrown Hairs
  • Quick and Effective
  • Remove Bumps, Stubble, Irritation, and Razor Burn
  • Smooth, Glassy Skin That You Will Love
  • Affordable Plans from Southern Cosmetic Laser

If this is your first foray into laser hair removal services, you're probably wondering how it all works.
Don't worry; we've got you covered!

What Happens During Laser Hair Removal Treatment?

Southern Cosmetic Laser hair removal involves several steps. Once you schedule an appointment, you will need to shave prior to your treatment. You will need to avoid plucking, waxing, threading and depilatory creams at least three weeks prior to treatment. During your day of treatment, the following will occur:

  1. Clean the treatment area to kill germs and bacteria
  2. Provide you with protective goggles or glasses to wear.
  3. Commence laser hair removal treatment using our cutting-edge lasers.
  4. A topical cooling product such as aloe may be applied after the treatment.
  5. Send you on your way feeling smooth and satisfied.

How Many Sessions Will I Need?

Services usually require an average of six to eight sessions with periodic touchups. However, sessions vary depending on your schedule and the area of your body that needs treatment. You may need more services on areas where hair grows quickly, like your upper lip. Some areas, like places on your back, will not require as many laser treatment sessions.

How Do Dermal Fillers Work?

Many of our patients know they want anti-aging services like fillers to help smooth out wrinkles and help lift. However, they don't know how dermal fillers, or injectables, work.

As people age, they lose collagen, elastin, and perhaps more importantly, hyaluronic acid. Hyaluronic acid helps retain moisture in your skin. Injectables that utilize hyaluronic acid and other substances help replace lost moisture, resulting in fuller, more radiant skin. Injectables and fillers can also help add extra volume to your lips and cheeks and firm up saggy skin.

Often, our patients see results after a single treatment, which can last as long as 9 to 18 months. Our patients choose Southern Cosmetic Laser because our fillers give a natural-looking result without affecting facial expressions, making for a discreet yet effective treatment.

Where Are Injectables Used?

We discuss and explain various types of fillers and decide which is best for you.

At Southern Cosmetic Laser, we offer personalized filler services for a number of problem areas, such as:

  1. Marionette Lines: These lines go directly down from the corners of your mouth and become more pronounced over time as your face loses volume.
  2. Cheeks: As you age, your cheeks lose volume, making you look gaunt and elderly. Our fillers plump up your cheeks, giving you a more youthful look without plastic surgery.
  3. Lips: Plumping up our patient's lips is one of our most popular injectable skincare services in St. Stephen. Our lip filler services are customized to each patient's preference, meaning we can help with subtle enhancements or obvious upgrades.
  4. Jaw and jawline areas.

Professional and Efficient from First Encounter

From anti-aging fillers for your lips to precise laser hair removal along your bikini line, Southern Cosmetic Laser has the team and tools to serve you with excellence. When it comes to cosmetic dermatology and medical aesthetics, we take pride in our experience and passion. We provide more than quick, effective services - we give our patients a relaxing, comforting experience catered to their needs. Our unparalleled customer service and state-of-the-art laser skin services in St. Stephen, SC, keeps our clients coming back.

We know that aging is inevitable, but that doesn't mean you have to succumb to the aging process. Call or click today to learn more about the Southern Cosmetic Laser difference and how we have thrived for over 18 years as St. Stephen's premier skincare and anti-aging treatment center.

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-277-2240

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Latest News in St. Stephen, SC

SC refuses to interfere with Delhi HC order permitting St Stephen’s College to hold interviews for minority seat admissions

The Supreme Court on Monday refused to interfere with the Delhi High Court interim order allowing St Stephen’s College to conduct interviews for granting admission to students under the minority quota besides taking into consideration their common university entrance test (CUET) scores.A bench of Justices A S Bopanna and P S Narasimha said any interference at this stage will create further confusion and uncertainty in the admission process.“Taking note that the impugned order is an interim order passed by the high c...

The Supreme Court on Monday refused to interfere with the Delhi High Court interim order allowing St Stephen’s College to conduct interviews for granting admission to students under the minority quota besides taking into consideration their common university entrance test (CUET) scores.

A bench of Justices A S Bopanna and P S Narasimha said any interference at this stage will create further confusion and uncertainty in the admission process.

“Taking note that the impugned order is an interim order passed by the high court in a pending writ petition, at this stage, we see no reason to interfere with the high court order,” the bench said.

The apex court also asked the high court to decide the matter expeditiously considering the need for certainty in the matter.

The top court was hearing a plea filed by Delhi University and University Grants Commission challenging the July 21 order of the high court.

Solicitor General Tushar Mehta, appearing for the varsity, sought a stay on the Delhi High Court order, contending that the selection process is still going on.

“This is a minority institution, therefore, 50 per cent of seats are filled by minority students. No difficulty with that. The question is how 50 per cent reserved seats are filled – first, strictly as per all-India merit list, i.e., CUET.

“Last year, they wanted to keep interviews for filling 50 per cent seats, DU directed them to fill 15 per cent out of this 50 per cent seats through interviews. Interviews are always a subjective thing. Because of the HC order, meritorious students are being left out,” he said.

Senior advocate A Mariarputham, appearing for St Stephen’s College, stated that there is an interim order, students have been selected and the classes have already commenced.

The bench said at this stage, it was not inclined to interfere with the interim order.

“At this stage, there will be more confusion for students,” the bench said.

Mehta submitted in case the high court comes to a conclusion that the interim order was wrong and every admission ought to have been on the basis of the merit list, then what would happen to those meritorious students who were not selected because of this interview process.

The law officer claimed seats filled on the basis of interviews have virtually become ‘payment seats’.

The bench said the high court passed the order on July 21 and admission process has already taken place.

“It may be really late now. There will be more uncertainty. Once matter is fully settled by high court, students will know what the situation is,” the bench said.

On July 21, the high court had permitted the college to conduct interviews for granting admission to students under the minority quota besides taking into consideration their CUET scores.

It had also permitted the Jesus and Mary College to hold interviews for the seats reserved for minority category students.

The high court’s order came on the applications by the two minority colleges to stay a December 8, 2022 decision of the executive council of the Delhi University (DU) insisting on 100 per cent weightage for CUET 2023 score for admission against minority quota quota seats.

The court had in its order observed that in an earlier decision, it has already discussed the extent to which DU can regulate the admission of minority students and ruled that St Stephen’s has the right to conduct interviews with 15 per cent weightage for minority students but not for non-minority students.

“Despite this observation made by this Court in the aforesaid judgment, the Executive Committee in its meeting dated December 8, 2022 has decided that for the academic session 2023-24, admission to the Undergraduate Programmes shall solely be on the basis of CUET for minority seats also,” said the high court bench.

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The high court had said there was prima facie a complete lack of reasoning as to why its earlier ruling was given a go-by by DU and that it indicated non-application of mind on its part while making the impugned decision.

Holding that the rights accorded to a minority institution under the Constitution cannot be extended to non-minorities, the high court had on September 12, 2022 directed St Stephen’s College to give 100 per cent weightage to the CUET 2022 score while granting admission to non-minority students in its undergraduate courses.

It had, however, said the college has the authority to conduct interviews in addition to the common university entrance test for admitting students belonging to the minority community but it cannot force non-minority candidates to additionally undergo an interview.

Earlier this year, St Stephen’s College had filed the petition against DU’s notification, contending that being a minority educational institution, its right to select students for admission and administer the educational institution under the Constitution cannot be interfered with or taken away.

Berkeley County Economic Development Hosting Public Meeting on Brownfield Grant

This informational meeting will provide more details on the $500,000 EPA Brownfield Assessment Grant Berkeley County Council accepted in September 2022. Economic Development officials and representatives with Terracon Consulting Engineers and Scientists, SC Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will be on hand to answer questions.This grant is part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Brownfield Assessment Grant Program and will help fund the first steps i...

This informational meeting will provide more details on the $500,000 EPA Brownfield Assessment Grant Berkeley County Council accepted in September 2022. Economic Development officials and representatives with Terracon Consulting Engineers and Scientists, SC Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will be on hand to answer questions.

This grant is part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Brownfield Assessment Grant Program and will help fund the first steps in a large-scale revitalization initiative to improve quality of life opportunities in the St. Stephen/Russellville area. Specifically, the grant will allow the Town of St. Stephen, Berkeley County Economic Development, and the EPA to work together to determine brownfield sites in the St. Stephen area that could be redeveloped to provide more job opportunities and other quality of life resources for the community.

Brownfield sites are properties that are or may be contaminated with hazardous substances, pollutants, petroleum, or other contaminants that pose a barrier to productive reuse. Such sites are often are in struggling neighborhoods and areas with blight, deteriorated infrastructure, or other challenges. A brownfield site may include public or private properties, green spaces, or parks in need of preservation. The grant has already identified two such sites: the former St. Stephen High School, which closed in 1996, and the area’s former Lumber Mill, which operated as a steam-powered lumber mill from the 1930s to mid-1960s and closed around 1970.

Members of the public are encouraged to submit information HERE if they own a property or know of a property in the St. Stephen area that could be considered for an assessment as a brownfield site. Landowners may be asked to participate in an assessment by providing information on the site’s history.

This EPA program also provides funding for these assessments—which are critical for determining real estate values—and will help identify and/or alleviate any potential environmental concerns at a site.

This revitalization initiative, which will be conducted in multiple phases, will include community input and engagement throughout the entirety of the process. For more information on the EPA Brownfield Assessment Grant Program, go HERE.

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-Prepared by the Berkeley County Public Information Office-

Berkeley County opened an application period from February 17 to March 17 for interested organizations to apply for funding. In partnership with Civitas LLC, the County established a CDBG Advisory Committee to review applicants and determine eligible groups before making a recommendation to Council. The money stems from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and will provide Berkeley County communities with resources to address unique community development needs. Funding has been awarded to the following local organizations for costs associated with public facilities and demolition:

*The approximately $1.28 million approved also includes $256,910 for administration and CDBG Program-related costs.

Through the CDBG program, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) approved $1,284,550 for Berkeley County to use to address community development needs. The County is also set to receive $552,117 in HOME funding from HUD for Program Year (PY) 2023, which begins July 1, 2023 and ends June 30, 2024. The above requests will be funded beginning July 1.

The CDBG Program provides annual grants on a formula basis to states, cities, and counties to develop viable urban communities by providing decent housing and a suitable living environment, and by expanding economic opportunities, principally for low- and moderate-income persons.

“We are excited to award this funding to help better serve a diverse set of support services throughout the County. Special thanks to the CDBG Advisory Committee and to each applicant for playing an important role in helping to meet the needs of our community.” -Berkeley County Supervisor Johnny Cribb

For more information on the CDBG Program, visit the County website or the U.S. Housing and Urban Development Program website.

Animal Control Seizes Dozens of Cats from Hoarding Situation in St. Stephen

MONCKS CORNER, S.C. – (Tuesday, February 14, 2023) – On February 9, 2023, Berkeley County Animal Control officers responded to a hoarding situation at a residential property near Harristown Road in St. Stephen, where they discovered dozens of cats in deteriorating conditions on the property, dubbed a “Cat Sanctuary.” Cats were located living inside a rundown trailer and outside the area.Officers seized 49 cats still alive but in poor health. An additional 23 cats were found deceased inside stru...

MONCKS CORNER, S.C. – (Tuesday, February 14, 2023) – On February 9, 2023, Berkeley County Animal Control officers responded to a hoarding situation at a residential property near Harristown Road in St. Stephen, where they discovered dozens of cats in deteriorating conditions on the property, dubbed a “Cat Sanctuary.” Cats were located living inside a rundown trailer and outside the area.

Officers seized 49 cats still alive but in poor health. An additional 23 cats were found deceased inside structures at the site. The cats were taken to Berkeley Animal Center, where 10 cats were forced to be euthanized due to their sickly condition. The remainder of the cats are in the care of Animal Center staff and in stable condition.

The shelter is seeking adult cat food as well as monetary donations for medical costs and other emergency care needs for the cats. Please consider donating HERE (enter “sick cats” under “reason for donation”). The cats will be available for adoption once they are nursed back to good health. Cat food can be dropped off at 131 Central Berkeley Drive in Moncks Corner.

“Berkeley Animal Center staff is committed to conducting the proper care necessary to ensure these sickly cats are restored to good health and receive the medical attention and affection they so desperately demand at this critical time in their lives. We know this is a dire situation and that unfortunately, not all the cats rescued from these deplorable conditions could be saved. We cannot change these cats’ past circumstances and lack of quality care, but we can do our best to provide them all they need to survive and thrive going forward. We thank our fellow rescue groups for partnering with us and sharing this same mission.” -Heather McDowell, Berkeley Animal Center Director

Additionally, 15 cats were transported to Massachusetts-based rescue groups MSPCA-Angell and Northeast Animal Shelter (NEAS), two organizations Berkeley Animal Center has been working with since last year. On the day of the seizure, MSPCA also sent staff to assist with the cats’ treatment at the shelter. Additionally, Charleston Animal Society provided a veterinarian to aid with the care.

“We needed to move quickly as the cats are in pretty rough shape. They were rescued from a dire situation and are lucky help arrived when it did.” -Mike Keiley, MSPCA-Angell Director of Adoption Centers and Programs / NEAS Executive Director

The Berkeley County Sheriff’s Office has cited Suzanne Marie Melton, an owner of the Cat Sanctuary, with 20 counts of inhumane treatment of animals.

SC turns down DU plea against St Stephen's minority admission policy

The Supreme Court on Monday refused to interfere with a Delhi high court’s interim order permitting the St Stephen’s college to conduct interview for the 50% minority quota seats and said that any order passed at this stage will be “too late” and result in “uncertainty” among students.The high court order passed on July 21 was challenged before the top court in two separate petitions filed by the Delhi University and the university grants commission (UGC). Dismissing the two petitions, a bench of ju...

The Supreme Court on Monday refused to interfere with a Delhi high court’s interim order permitting the St Stephen’s college to conduct interview for the 50% minority quota seats and said that any order passed at this stage will be “too late” and result in “uncertainty” among students.

The high court order passed on July 21 was challenged before the top court in two separate petitions filed by the Delhi University and the university grants commission (UGC). Dismissing the two petitions, a bench of justices AS Bopanna and PS Narasimha said, “Taking note that the order passed is an interim order and the high court has made admission subject to the final outcome of the writ petition, we see no reason to interfere at this stage.”

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This is the second year that the high court permitted the college to fill up the 50% Christian quota seats by giving 15% weightage to interviews. The college had approached the high court challenging a December 30 notification issued by the DU directing all admissions under the minority quota to be filled up solely on the basis of the common university entrance test (CUET) scores. The top court order told the high court, “Considering there should be certainty in the matter, we request the high court to decide (the petition) as expeditiously as possible.”

The Delhi University represented by Solicitor General Tushar Mehta told the Court that the last date for close of admissions is August 31 and the college should not be permitted to proceed forward with the interviews. Defending the December 30 notification, Mehta said, “Last year, the college was allowed to give 15% weightage to interview. This year, we insisted they can select only meritorious students based on CUET scores against the minority seats. Due to the HC order, meritorious candidates are being left out.”

The college represented by senior advocate A Mariarputham and advocate Romy Chacko said that the admission process for this academic year is over. The senior counsel stated that the admission was not “unilateral” as the University was supplied the final list of students admitted under Christian quota. The list was approved and the University sent email to students for paying fees.

The bench told Mehta, “It will be unfair to students to interfere at this stage. There will be uncertainty among student community.” Pointing out the fact that the University has endorsed the admissions, the bench said, “You have written to the students to pay fees and the letter does not say the admission will be subject to the order (of high court). You are a little late to approach us.”

Mehta told the Court that the University was bound to process the admissions or else there will be contempt of the HC order. The Court said, “The HC order is of July 21 and one month has passed. You should have approached us before. The 15% weightage is an issue you will have to argue before the high court.”

The bench wished to know during the hearing if any meritorious students had approached the Court complaining against the interview process. Senior advocate Arun Bhardwaj appearing for a Christian candidate said that a petition is in the process of being filed as the petitioner atttended the interview but did not get admission. The solicitor general told the Court that it is only a matter of opening a small window for such candidates.

“Stephens is a prime college where admission cut offs end at 98-99 %. If a window is provided, the admission process can be over within a day,” Mehta said.

The bench maintained its stand and said, “At this stage there will be more confusion if we interfere as some students would have already been interviewed. It could happen next year. As per the interim order, let admissions go on.

On Friday, when the matter came up for hearing in the top court, Mehta claimed that the seats filled up through interview have virtually become “payment seats” to which the college had objected.

The college had approached the HC challenging a December 8 order passed by the DU executive council to the effect that even in respect of 50% minority quota seats, admission should solely be on the basis of CUET scores and no interview or addition of 15% marks for interview will be permitted. This led to the December 30 notification.

The HC in its July 21 order said, “A prima facie case has been made out that the petitioner will suffer an irreparable loss if interim relief is not granted at this juncture. The balance of convenience also lies in favour of the petitioner.”

The college claimed that over the years, it has been making admissions to undergraduate courses by earmarking 15% weightage for personal interaction or interview. Last year, with the introduction of CUET, the college had to admit students to its general category seats solely on CUET scores as the top court had in October 2022 refused to stay the HC order.

Last year too, when the controversy over CUET being applicable to minority quota seats arose, the HC had on September 9, 2022 permitted St Stephen’s to conduct interview for Christian students. Relying on this order, the HC extended the benefit to the college for this year too.

Get latest news onEducation along with updates on Board Exams and Competitive Exams at Hindustan Times. Also get latest Job updates on Employment News.

Dozens of hoarded cats located in St. Stephen

A Feb. 9 house inspection by the Berkeley County Animal Control uncovered a total of 72 living and deceased cats inside what was described as a “cat sanctuary” near Harristown Road in St. Stephen.A Berkeley County press release states that 49 living — but sickly — felines and 23 dead ones were located in and around a rundown trailer.The living animals were transported to the Berkeley Animal Center where 10 of the ailing cats were euthanized. The remaining group are being cared for at the center and are i...

A Feb. 9 house inspection by the Berkeley County Animal Control uncovered a total of 72 living and deceased cats inside what was described as a “cat sanctuary” near Harristown Road in St. Stephen.

A Berkeley County press release states that 49 living — but sickly — felines and 23 dead ones were located in and around a rundown trailer.

The living animals were transported to the Berkeley Animal Center where 10 of the ailing cats were euthanized. The remaining group are being cared for at the center and are in stable condition.

Donations of cat food are needed, as well as monetary assistance for medical costs and emergency care needs. Cat food can be dropped off at 131 Central Berkeley Drive in Moncks Corner.

These cats will be made available for adoption once they’re nursed back to optimal health.

It was also noted that 15 of the cats were relocated to two Massachusetts-based rescue organizations MSPCA-Angell and Northeast Animal Shelter. A Charleston Animal Society veterinarian is also offering their services in rehabilitating the animals in question.

The owner of the cat sanctuary, Suzanne Marie Melton, has been cited by the Berkeley County Sheriff’s Office with 20 counts of inhumane treatment of animals.

“Berkeley Animal Center staff is committed to conducting the proper care necessary to ensure these sickly cats are restored to good health and receive the medical attention and affection they so desperately demand at this critical time in their lives. We know this is a dire situation and that unfortunately, not all the cats rescued from these deplorable conditions could be saved. We cannot change these cats’ past circumstances and lack of quality care, but we can do our best to provide them all they need to survive and thrive going forward. We thank our fellow rescue groups for partnering with us and sharing this same mission,” Berkeley Animal Center Director Heather McDowell.

2/15- UPDATE: Berkeley Animal Center Shelter Manager Tiffany Hoffman reports that the roughly two dozen cats being cared for present a variety of upper respiratory illness and ringworm. Some it was noted are FIV positive.

“We’re expecting more cats to come in with trapping going on around the property,” said Hoffman. “We have a small staff. We need medical fosters in homes with no other cats.”

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